Odyssey Bulbs PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA 01561
978-333-0139
FALL 2018 PRICE LIST
ORDERING GUIDELINES
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ODYSSEY PERENNIALS
2018 CATALOG BY GENUS
Allium
Anemone
Arisaema
Arum
Bellevalia
Camassia
Chionodoxa
Colchicum
Convallaria
Corydalis
Fall Crocus
Spring Crocus
Eranthis
Erythronium
Fritillaria
Galanthus
Geranium
Gladiolus
Hyacinthoides
Ipheion
Iris
Leucojum
Merendera
Muscari
Narcissus
Nectaroscordum
Ornithogalum
Ostrowskia
Polygonatum
Puschkinia
Ranunculus
Scilla
Tulipa
SANGUINARIA (Hyacinthaceae)
Bloodroot

OSTROWSKIA (Campanulaceae)
 
Ostrowskia magnifica ~ The magnificent, stupendous, mystical Holy Grail of campanulads, this denizen of rocky crags in the Pamir-Alai produces impossibly large, 5-inch-wide, pure white bells on strong stems that can reach 5 feet tall. It does best in full sun; deep, gritty, humus-rich soil; and a relatively arid climate (but it's well worth trying elsewhere!). Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$40

POLYGONATUM (Liliaceae)
Solomon's seal
 
Polygonatum humile ~ Pleated, shiny, oval leaves staggered along erect, 8-inch-tall stems give the impression of a robust P. hookeri. The dangling white bell-flowers in spring are relatively large in proportion to the herbage. Well-drained, humus-rich soil and partial shade are best. Modified continental/Continental/Maritime; E Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$5
Polygonatum × hybridum 'Striatum' ~ The crinkled, dark green, leaves of 'Striatum' are more heavily marked with cream than are those of long-time favorite P. multiflorum 'Variegatum' (q.v.). Clusters of dangling alabaster-white bell-flowers with green-tinged tips adorn the arching, 18-inch-tall stems in late spring. Partial shade and a woodsy soil will keep it happy. Modified continental/Continental/Maritime; Eurasia. Zone 4.
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1/$9

PUSCHKINIA (Hyacinthaceae)
Striped squill
 
Puschkinia scilloides 'Aragats' Gem' ~ From Armenia's Mt. Aragats to your garden, here is a major advance over the material commonly available in the trade, with larger flowers in fuller racemes. It so far surpasses other cultivated forms that you may find yourself wanting to stage a puschkinia putsch. Modified continental/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$8
Puschkinia scilloides 'Sky Vision' ~ Announcing the new Queen of the Striped Squills. The light hyacinth-blue flowers (with the usual deep blue midstripes) are larger and deeper in hue than those of other forms, and there are more of them. Time to start building that puschkinia collection! Modified continental/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$9

RANUNCULUS (Ranunculaceae)
 
Ranunculus kochii (Ficaria fascicularis) ~ This smaller, more floriferous, well-behaved cousin of Ranunculus ficaria produces bunches of shiny yellow flowers in late winter. It's an excellent and non-hegemonous choice for early color in a trough or rock garden. Montane.; W Asia Zone 5.
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1/$5
 
Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex ~ The ruffled, pure white flowers of double bloodroot are the embodiment of perfection, at least for a few fleeting days in April. It's one of the supreme expressions of the North American woodland flora. Modified continental/Continental; E and C North America. Zone 4.
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1/$18

SCILLA (Hyacinthaceae)
Squill
 
Scilla bifolia var. taurica RS.156/83 ~ With its large blue flowers, adorned with prominent purple anthers, this is one of the best takes on one of the essential early bulbs. The one-sided racemes appear as early as February. The vigorous form offered here hails from Crimea. Zone 5.Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$7
Scilla bithynica ~ This exceptionally showy and floriferous (but rarely available) squill produces domed clusters of 8 to 12 bright lilac-blue flowers on 8-inch stems in late winter and early spring. It often naturalizes in partial shade. Mediterranean; Bulgaria to W Turkey. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Scilla hohenackeri BSBE.559 We have yet to see a spring squill that is not beautiful, and the Caspian bluebell is surely among the most beguiling. Clusters of large light purple-blue flowers whose segments reflex to reveal black anthers open on 4-inch stems in late winter. Each segment is ornamented with a sky-blue midrib, which adds a final note of beauty and elegance. Steppe/Montane; Caspian region. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Scilla ingridae ~ Take a Siberian squill, increase its size, intensify its color, and start its blooming season a few days earlier, and you've got a standout bulb for the late-winter garden. Or, rather, WE'VE got it. Modified continental/Mediterranean; S Europe. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Scilla siberica 'Enem' ~ Its flowers are very early, very sky-blue (with not a hint of white markings), and they bow gracefully from contrasting black-purple stems. An excellent form of Siberian squill. Steppe/Modified continental/Montane; Caspian region. Zone 5.
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1/$4
Scilla 'Aethra' ~ This possible hybrid of Chionodoxa forbesii and Scilla bifolia appeared as a spontaneous seedling in the garden of Arnis Seisums, where it drew attention with its clusters of large, bright blue, white-eyed flowers with broad overlapping segments. Now it can do same in your garden! Steppe/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$8
Scilla 'Sibrose' ~ Combining the best characteristics of Scilla siberica and Scilla rosenii, this lust-worthy hybrid possesses the vigor and floriferousness of the former and the amplitude and elegance of the latter. The summer-sky-blue flowers are larger, a bit paler, and more elegant than those of Siberian squill, with slightly reflexed segments and prominent stamens that have an Erythronium look to them, showing their rosenii heritage. Steppe/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$8

STERNBERGIA (Amaryllidaceae)
 
Sternbergia greuteriana ~ Effectively (and possibly taxonomically) a lesser version of Sternbergia lutea, this little charmer is ideal for a small, summer-dry trough. Its numerous yellow flowers with rather narrow segments appear in mid-autumn, just when you could use some sunshine. Mediterranean; Greek islands. Zone 6.
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1/$20
Sternbergia lutea ex Peloponnese ~ The necessity of possessing this large, lemon-yellow form of the iconic "autumn daffodil" should be self-evident to any gardener who has been posessed by sternbergia lust (or bulb/plant lust in general). Mediterranean; Greece. Zone 6.
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1/$11
Sternbergia sicula ~ Sometimes included in S. lutea, it's slightly smaller, paler, and narrower-leaved. It's equally desirable. Mediterranean; SE Europe. Zone 6.
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1/$11

TULIPA (Liliaceae)
Tulip
 

Offering some of the most spectacular and elegant flowers in the genus, "species tulips" are also valuable for their relative longevity and for their adaptability to conditions most tulip hybrids can't tolerate. T. clusiana and T . saxatilis , for example, are among the few tulips that thrive and flower in southern California, the southeast U.S., and other mild-winter areas. It is a group of bulbs that deserves considerably more attention from gardeners.  Unless stated otherwise, they prefer well-drained soil and sun.
 
Tulipa biflora ~ A number of Central Asian tulip species produce elfin white flowers with yellow centers over clumps of narrow leaves. All of them are charming (this one included). They also appreciate lots of sun, and not so much summer moisture (coarse, fertile soil works well). Steppe; C Asia. Zone 5.
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1/$2
Tulipa bifloriformis 'Starlight' ~ This superior selection produces white, yellow-eyed star-flowers in early spring on 2- to 3-inch stems. The flowers are brighter in hue and more compact in habit than those of the form that's commonly offered. Steppe; C Asia. Zone 5.
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1/$5
Tulipa dubia Beldersai ~ With its carmine, yellow-picoteed flowers and boldly maroon-striped leaves, this is an especially striking form of an already beautiful tulip. Inside, the flowers are pure gleaming yellow. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 5.
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1/$8
Tulipa greigii 'Evening Fire' ~ Large smoldering-red flowers accented by black basal blotches and maroon-banded leaves distinguish this exceptional selection from Berkara Gorge in southern Kazhakstan. Steppe/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Tulipa greigii 'Sunset' ('Saulriets') ~ Large, glossy, brilliant golden-yellow flowers are marked at their centers with crimson flames that narrow into midstripes toward the tips of the pointed, arching petals. The glaucous leaves show hints of maroon striping. A show-stopper, originating in Berkara Gorge, Kazakhstan, and selected by Janis Ruksans. Steppe/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$9
Tulipa hissarica ~ One of the choicest and earliest-blooming dwarf tulips, this little dandy opens its starry, buttercup-yellow, 2.5-inch-wide flowers in late winter and early spring, alongside the crocuses. Combine it with Crocus vernus and some netted iris and your rock garden (or trough) will really rock.Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 5.
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1/$7
Tulipa humilis 'Rosea' ~ Elegant pink-blushed chalices with deep amethyst-blue centers are borne on sturdy gray-green scapes in early spring. Not to be confused with the much more common 'Alba Coerulea Occulata'. Steppe/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$4
Tulipa humilis 'Zephyr' ~ Bright scarlet goblets with charcoal-purple eye zones arise in early spring from rosettes of narrow, upright, blue-green leaves. This 1987 introduction is one of the rarest and most dazzling Tulipa humilis cultivars (we're likely the only U.S. source). Steppe/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$4
Tulipa kaufmanniana Ugam ~ This new selection from the wilds of Kazakhstan bears lovely rosy-pink flowers with white "petal" margins and white interiors on relatively tall (12- to 15-inch) stems very early in the tulip season. Steppe/Montane; Kazakhstan. Zone 5.
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1/$5
Tulipa sprengeri ~ A maverick among tulips, this remarkable species is not only exceptionally adaptable – flowering, persisting, and often self-sowing in sun or shade, moist soil or dry – it also is among the tallest (16 to 20 inches) and latest (May to June bloom). Rarely offered and highly prized. Mediterranean/Modified contienental; NW Turkey. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$6
Tulipa vvedenskyi ~ Va-va-voom. Although 'Tangerine Beauty,' the commonly offered clone of this species, is a perfectly nice plant, it certainly doesn't supersede the original. So allow us to reintroduce you to this "beautiful, but rare species" (Jelitto & Schacht), with vivid (or is it vved?), red-orange, wide-flaring flowers – shaded yellow at their centers – on 8- to 12-inch stems in April. The narrow, gray-green leaves are also attractive.
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1/$3
Tulipa whittallii hort. ~ The flower is a bit of a milquetoast on the outside, cloaked in subdued tones of pale yellow and green. But – surprise! – inside it's a startling, swashbuckling bright orange. Your inner child (as well as any outer children you might have) will love it. We continue to employ the longstanding horticultural name of this tulip, which properly belongs under T. orphanidea. All that Southeast and California gardeners need to know is that it is one of the best tulips for their climates. Mediterranean; Zone 6.
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1/$4
Tulipa gold hybrid ~ Glowing golden-yellow flowers with scarlet-flamed and chocolate-eyed centers are held on compact stems in early spring. Maroon streaks ornament the gray-green leaves. We have yet to put a name to this excellent Ruksans hybrid of T. vvedenskyi. Zone 5. Modified continental/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$4
Tulipa 'Goldmine' ~ Buttercup-yellow, short-stemmed goblets with orange-flamed exteriors and black, scarlet-haloed centers are produced in early spring over maroon-streaked, blue-green leaves. Janis Ruksans is responsible for this T. vvedenskyi hybrid as well, and it's one of his best. Zone 5. Modified continental/Montane. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Tulipa 'Latvian Gold' ~ Yet another in the series of lovely T. vvedenskyi hybrids from Janis Ruksans, 'Latvian Gold' flaunts large creamy-yellow flowers that deepen to butter-yellow lower down. Their centers and exteriors are accented with raspberry-red markings. The flowers arise in April on 4-inch-elongating-to-12-inch stems that are clothed with undulating, maroon-mottled leaves. Zone 5.
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1/$4


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ODYSSEY BULBS
PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA  01561
mail@odysseybulbs.com