Odyssey Bulbs PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA 01561
800-517-5152
ORDERING GUIDELINES
FALL 2014 PRICE LIST
2014 CATALOG BY GENUS
Allium
Anemone
Arisaema
Arum
Camassia
Chionodoxa
Colchicum
Convallaria
Corydalis
Fall Crocus
Spring Crocus
Eranthis
Erythronium
Fritillaria
Galanthus
Geranium
Gladiolus
Hepatica
Hyacinthoides
Hyacinthus
Iris
Leucojum
Muscari
Narcissus
Nectaroscordum
Ornithogalum
Pinellia
Polygonatum
Puschkinia
Romulea
Scilla
Triteleia
Tulipa
FALL-BLOOMING CROCUS

Everyone knows that crocuses are heralds of spring. That's probably why most people are unaware that many of the best crocuses for the garden flower in autumn. The fall-blooming crocuses (not to be confused with autumn crocus, a misleading common name often used for Colchicum) encompass dozens of species, collectively flowering from August to December. Among them are such notables as saffron crocus (C. sativus) and its ancestors and relations; C. speciosus, perhaps the largest-flowered (as well as among the hardiest) of the genus; C. kotschyanus, one of the best crocuses for naturalizing; and the singularly beautiful C. banaticus, once fittingly known as C. iridiflorus (or "iris-flowered crocus"). Like their spring-blooming kin, they are great for garden nooks or for carpeting borders or lawns; they generally prefer well-drained, humus-rich soils and ample sun (although some take well to partial shade); and they may require protection from rodents. But they diverge from the spring-bloomers in their predilection for flower colors other than yellow.
Crocus banaticus ~ Distinctive, relatively large, lilac to purple blooms with erect, 1-inch inner lobes and reflexing, 2-inch outer lobes debut in late September and continue for several weeks. The leaves – which appear in spring – are unusually broad and lack the central striping typical of the genus. This all-too-rare beauty thrives and self-sows in partial shade and humus-rich soil. Award of Garden Merit recipient. Modified continental; N Romania to SW Russia. Zone 4. AGM SOLD OUT
1/$8
Crocus cartwrightianus mixed seedlings ~ Here's a seedling mix of saffron's presumed ancestor. More floriferous than its domesticated descendant, Crocus cartwrightianus produces up to 10 purple-veined blooms in late autumn. The large cayenne-red styles make excellent saffron. Flowers in this mix will vary in color, with some white flowers possible. Sun and well-drained soil required. Mediterranean; Greece to Crete. Zone 6. AGM
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1/$8
Crocus hadriaticus 'Annabelle' ~ Its namesake is a pachyderm, its sibling is 'Jumbo', and its ample, mid-autumn flowers are white with yellow throats and orange styles. Mediterranean; W & S Greece. Zone 6.
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1/$6
Crocus kotschyanus ssp. kotschyanus HKEP.9317 ~ No, this isn't one of those new nonsense cultivar names that trash botanical nomenclature for the purpose of maximizing profit (there - got that off our chest); it's the collector's number for a highly meritorious clone recently collected and introduced by crocophiles Helmut Kerndorff and Erich Pasche. Not only does it flaunt larger flowers than most other clones, but it also spreads by stolons to form colonies. Highly desirable. Steppe; Zone 5.
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1/$6
Crocus kotschyanus 'Reliance' ~ This highly acclaimed, floriferous selection opens its bluish-lilac, orange-eyed flowers in early fall, before the leaves expand. Steppe/Mediterranean; Asia Minor. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Crocus niveus late-blooming VV.KA.2312 ~ Large snowy flowers with vividly contrasting orange-red styles (a stylistic triumph if ever there was one) arise on stout flower tubes in late October, casting the scent of appleblossoms and luring hungry late-season bees. This is a splendid selection of one of our favorite fall-blooming crocuses. Mediterranean; S Greece. Zone 6.
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1/$7
Crocus nudiflorus JMH.8149 ~ Here we have a robust, violet-flowered form of a highly sought-after crocus species, whose large early fall blooms (arising from stoloniferous corms) are of near-Colchicum magnitude. Naturalized colonies of this long-treasured species sometimes haunt ruined English monasteries, a legacy of its cultivation (as a saffron substitute) in bygone times. Adaptable and hardy, it tolerates moist soil and will naturalize in thin grass. Pyrenees; >/Montane/Modified continental. Zone 5.
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1/$9
Crocus pallasii ssp. turcicus ex VV.TW.855 ~ Saffron-scented, purple-striped blooms with luminous, starry-pointed, pale lavender-blue segments are freely produced in mid-autumn. Like all saffron crocuses, it takes well to coarse-textured soil and full sun. Mediterranean; SE Turkey to Lebanon. Zone 6.
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1/$10
Crocus pulchellus ~ "Well named," says Elizabeth Lawrence, "for the flowers are so adorable that it is hard to describe them without sounding foolish." Well, here goes. Rounded, fragrant, lilac-blue, orange-throated, violet-veined, 1.5-inch goblets, on white "stems" in October. Robust, self-sowing freely and thriving in sun or semi-shade. Spring leaves. Mediterranean/ Modified continental; Balkans to Turkey. Zone 5/6. AGM
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1/$4
Crocus pulchellus 'Inspiration' ~ Echoing the October sky, the bright blue, orange-throated flowers of this robust selection appear for several weeks in mid-fall. Like others of its kind, it flourishes and often self-sows in sun or semi-shade. Mediterranean/Modified continental; Balkans to Turkey. Zone 5/6.
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1/$7
Crocus serotinus ssp. salzmanii 'Erectophyllus' ~ The large, fragrant, violet flowers of this vigorous, superior selection debut in October and continue for several weeks. The leaves arise in early fall. Mediterranean; Spain. Zone 6.
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1/$6
Crocus speciosus ssp. xantholaimos ~ Compared to others of this species, this recently discovered Turkish subspecies is distinguished by smaller (rock gardeners, take note), later, lavender-blue, yellow-throated flowers, their segments liberally traced with darker veining. Mediterranean/Modified continental; N Turkey. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$7


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ODYSSEY BULBS
PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA  01561
mail@odysseybulbs.com