Odyssey Bulbs PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA 01561
FALL 2019 PRICE LIST
ORDERING GUIDELINES
ORDER A GIFT CERTIFICATE
ODYSSEY PERENNIALS
2019 CATALOG BY GENUS
Allium
Anemone
Arisaema
Arum
Bellevalia
Camassia
Chionodoxa
Colchicum
Convallaria
Corydalis
Fall Crocus
Spring Crocus
Eranthis
Erythronium
Fritillaria
Galanthus
Geranium
Gladiolus
Hyacinthoides
Ipheion
Iris
Leucojum
Merendera
Muscari
Narcissus
Nectaroscordum
Ornithogalum
Ostrowskia
Puschkinia
Ranunculus
Scilla
Tulipa
FALL-BLOOMING CROCUS

Everyone knows that crocuses are heralds of spring. That's probably why most people are unaware that many of the best crocuses for the garden flower in autumn. The fall-blooming crocuses (not to be confused with autumn crocus, a misleading common name often used for Colchicum) encompass dozens of species, collectively flowering from August to December. Among them are such notables as saffron crocus (C. sativus) and its ancestors and relations; C. speciosus, perhaps the largest-flowered (as well as among the hardiest) of the genus; C. kotschyanus, one of the best crocuses for naturalizing; and the singularly beautiful C. banaticus, once fittingly known as C. iridiflorus (or "iris-flowered crocus"). Like their spring-blooming kin, they are great for garden nooks or for carpeting borders or lawns; they generally prefer well-drained, humus-rich soils and ample sun (although some take well to partial shade); and they may require protection from rodents. But they diverge from the spring-bloomers in their predilection for flower colors other than yellow.
Crocus cartwrightianus 'Ana´s' ~ Here's a richly hued selection of saffron crocus' presumed ancestor, Crocus cartwrightianus. The deep lavender blooms are feathered with aubergine veins that coalesce into a central eye, in shadowy contrast to the brilliant paprika-red styles (which make good saffron, if you want to go that route. Mediterranean; Greece to Crete. Zone 6. Mediterranean; W & S Greece. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$10
Crocus hadriaticus seedlings ~ A close relative of saffron's presumed parent, Crocus cartwrightianus, this native of western and southern Greece gives the appearance of a superior white-flowered, yellow-throated form of the same, occasionally with a touch of lilac suffusion. A few of these seedlings may depart from pure white. Mediterranean; W & S Greece. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$5
Crocus kotschyanus ssp. kotschyanus flowering form ~ Unlike the florally challenged forms of this species that are typically offered in the mass bulb trade, this selection blooms reliably and prolifically, beginning in mid-October here. The interiors of the pale lavender-blue flowers are decorated with purple pinstripes, along with the usual basal ring of egg-yolk-yellow blotches. Self-sowing happens. Steppe/Mediterranean; Asia Minor. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$3
Crocus laevigatus CEH.612 ~ Crocuses for Christmas! In mild winters (such as the one we're currently experiencing), the fragrant, pale lilac, violet-veined goblets of this seedling strain often open around the time of the solstice (as well as before and after). It's been a while since we offered any material of this latest- (and earliest-) blooming crocus species, so get it while you can! Mediterranean; Greece. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$9
Crocus mathewii 'Purple Eye' ~ Closely resembling the beautiful 'Dream Dancer', this sterile, floriferous selection of one of the most sought-after crocus species produces numerous pale lilac, pink-suffused flowers, each accented by an aubergine eye and tangerine-orange styles. Mediterranean; S Turkey. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$15
Crocus niveus ex locus classicus ~ Large snowy yellow-eyed flowers with vividly contrasting orange-red styles (a stylistic triumph if ever there was one) arise on stout flower tubes in late October, casting the scent of appleblossoms and luring hungry late-season bees. This large-flowered selection of one of our favorite fall-blooming crocuses originates from material collected in the neighborhood of the species' locus classicus near Areopolis, Greece. Mediterranean; S Greece. Zone 6.
Enter quantity:
1/$8
Crocus pulchellus ~ "Well named," says Elizabeth Lawrence, "for the flowers are so adorable that it is hard to describe them without sounding foolish." Well, here goes. Rounded, fragrant, lilac-blue, orange-throated, violet-veined, 1.5-inch goblets, on white "stems" in October. Robust, self-sowing freely and thriving in sun or semi-shade. Spring leaves. Mediterranean/ Modified continental; Balkans to Turkey. Zone 5/6. AGM
Enter quantity:
1/$4
Crocus pulchellus 'Inspiration' ~ Echoing the October sky, the bright blue, orange-throated flowers of this outstanding, robust selection appear for several weeks in mid-fall. Like others of its kind, it flourishes and often self-sows in sun or semi-shade. Mediterranean/Modified continental; Balkans to Turkey. Zone 5/6.
Enter quantity:
1/$8
Crocus puringii (Crocus speciosus 'Aino') ~ The violet-blue, purple-veined flowers of this recent introduction are remarkably large and showy, even for this showiest of crocus species. Which – incidentally – it apparently doesn't belong to, having been moved to its own species by verdict of Janis Ruksans. The flowers are also remarkably weather-resistant, standing up to just about whatever mid-autumn throws at them. Mediterranean/Modified continental; Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$7
Crocus speciosus ssp. xantholaimos ~ Compared to others of this species, this recently discovered Turkish subspecies is distinguished by smaller (rock gardeners, take note), later, lavender-blue, yellow-throated flowers, their segments liberally traced with darker veining. Some authorities place it in its own species. Mediterranean/Modified continental; N Turkey. Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$9
Crocus 'Florane' ~ Spring crocuses have a slew of named hybrids, so why shouldn't fall crocuses get in on the fun, particularly since they're equally promiscuous? Crocuses from the saffron group are particularly frisky, with sometimes delightful results, as in this cross between C. oreocreticus and C. cartwrightianus. The large, pale lilac flowers have aubergine veins and eyezones, as well as the usual central triad of aromatic, cinnamon-red styles. Mediterranean/Modified continental; Zone 5.
Enter quantity:
1/$14


top of page


ODYSSEY BULBS
PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA  01561
mail@odysseybulbs.com