Odyssey Bulbs PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA 01561
978-333-0139
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ODYSSEY PERENNIALS
2017 CATALOG BY GENUS
Allium
Anemone
Arisaema
Arum
Bellevalia
Camassia
Chionodoxa
Colchicum
Convallaria
Corydalis
Fall Crocus
Spring Crocus
Eranthis
Erythronium
Fritillaria
Galanthus
Geranium
Gladiolus
Hyacinthoides
Hyacinthus
Ipheion
Iris
Leucojum
Merendera
Muscari
Narcissus
Nectaroscordum
Ornithogalum
Ostrowskia
Polygonatum
Puschkinia
Ranunculus
Scilla
Tulipa
CORYDALIS (Fumariaceae)
Fumewort
 

We, like many other plantaholics, have fallen under the spell of these perky little denizens of forest and mountain. What gardener with a heart and soul could resist their spring flowers, whose winged petals with upswept spurs suggest a flight of elfin butterflies? Or, for that matter, their lacily divided leaves, which come in a kaleidoscope of colors from gray to deep green? As a tribe that hails from diverse habitats across much of the northern hemisphere, Corydalis includes at least a few species for any garden, whatever its circumstances. Gardeners with shade and summer rain can select from the bounty of species that inhabit the woodlands of Europe, east Asia, and North America. Conversely, those who garden in rocky or sandy soil or in dry-summer areas can explore the diversity of the Mediterranean and central Asian species. Not that you have to restrict yourself to species from similar climes. Indeed, as long as they are buffered from summer heat and drought (the woodlanders) or from excess summer moisture (the Mediterranean and steppe natives), most corydalis will succeed in climates that depart from that of their home range (some corydaphiles even dig the tubers in summer to keep them sufficiently dry). For all these reasons and more, Corydalis should be a staple of any bulb garden (or bulb frame).

Corydalis decipiens hort. ~ Although its identity is under debate (it probably derives from Corydalis solida ssp. incisa ), it's beyond dispute that this vigorous clone – which bears crowds of purple flowers on 8-inch stems for weeks in early April – is among the best "bulbs" for the spring shade garden (which is why it won the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit). Modified continental/Mediterranean; Balkans. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$6
Corydalis densiflora ~ This rarely offered and highly desirable relative of C. solida produces (in this case) long spikes of large, curving, purplish-pink blooms above clumps of blue-green leaves. Given its native range, it should be well adapted to areas such as coastal California and the Pacific Northwest. But it also seems at home (and increases well) in our less than moderate winters (and summers). Mediterranean/Montane; S Italy. Zone 6.
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1/$6
Corydalis glaucescens 'Early Beauty' ~ This pale-pink-flowered selection is especially valuable for its early bloom season (March & early April). As with all forms of this species, it has pretty divided gray-green leaves, and needs a sunny position with relatively dry soil in summer (good drainage is required in areas with year-round rain). Steppe; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$12
Corydalis glaucescens 'Medeo' ~ In this equally alluring but somewhat later-blooming version of C. glaucescens, the white petals bear a rose-lilac central stripe. Steppe; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$9
Corydalis glaucescens 'Moonlight' ~ The pink-suffused, creamy-white flowers of this elegant but rarely offered cultivar appear in abundance in mid-April. Steppe; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$9
Corydalis glaucescens 'Pink Beauty' ~ Yet another gorgeous take on this many-splendored species, bearing copious quantities of soft-pink flowers, in perfect counterpoint to the gray foliage. Striking. Steppe; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$9
Corydalis integra ~ Much more elegant than the Honda model of the same name, and far longer lived in the open garden, this vigorous and hardy species bears relatively tall many-flowered spires of palest pink blooms with long spurs and purple snouts. The glaucous leaves provide a natty foil. It blooms with most of the rest of the corydali – mid-April here. A cliff-dweller in the wild, it is a natural for walls and embankments (although flat and gritty is fine too). Modified continental/Mediterranean/Montane; E Balkans to NW Turkey. Zone 5.
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1/$9
Corydalis kusnetzovii ~ Borne over a relatively long period toward the end of the corydalis season, the flowers give the impression of a pink-suffused C. vittae, which if you're a corydaphile should have you scrambling for your checkbook. If you're not a corydaphile, perhaps you haven't experienced this species. It's never too late to start a new plant addiction. Modified continental; NW Caucasus, SW Russia. Zone 5.
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1/$12
Corydalis nudicaulis ~ "Elegant and distinct" (Lidén & Zetterlund), this recently introduced species – with airy, many-flowered clusters of slender, long-spurred, white, chocolate-dipped flowers in early April on 6-inch stems – is high on every corydaphile's wishlist. Quite adaptable, it prefers full to partial sun and humus-rich, sharply drained soil. Steppe; Tajikistan. Zone 5.
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1/$15
Corydalis paczoskii ~ A close relative of C. angustifolia, sharing its dark-nosed, long-spurred flowers (and elegant foliage), but departing in their purple coloration. A splendid subject for naturalizing in dappled shade, it self-sows in humus-rich, well-drained soils. Modified continental; Ukraine & Crimea. Zone 5.
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1/$15
Corydalis ruksansii ~ Any corydalis named after Janis Ruksans, corydalis guru, has to be good. This is. The flowers resemble those of C. nudicaulis, but with the chocolate coloration confined to their tips, giving them a rather endearing "button nose" look. Here in central Massachusetts (a far cry from Central Asia), Ruksans' corydalis grows and increases well in porous, summer-dry soil. Steppe; Tadjikistan. Zone 5.
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1/$15
Corydalis schanginii ssp. ainae ~ The large, long-tailed blooms of this "gem of the genus" (Lidén & Zetterlund) have clear golden-yellow, purple-tipped "snouts" that taper to twisting, pale pink spurs – an arresting color scheme. Completing the picture are the purple-tinged stems and fleshy silver-gray leaves. A masterpiece. Given dryish summer conditions and ample light, it should succeed outdoors in most cold-winter areas of the U.S. Steppe; Kazakhstan. Zone 4.
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1/$15
Corydalis schanginii ssp. schanginii ~ If it's possible for any corydalis to be more magnificent than C. schanginii ssp. ainae, here it is. Swarms of enormous (by corydaline standards) flowers of soft rose-pink (with contrasting purple veins and tips) crowd long racemes above a complement of fleshy gray leaves. Although it demands good drainage and full sun, especially if it is to survive in the open garden in moist-summer areas, it is well worth every effort. Steppe; S Russia to W Mongolia. Zone 4.
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1/$12
Corydalis solida 'Ballade' ~ Every year we offer ever more of the rarest and best cultivars of C. solida. At the risk of mixing our musical idioms (given that we also sometimes have a 'Cantata' on the program), here is a robust violet-flowered selection from the redoubtable Janis Ruksans. The long-spurred, white-mouthed blooms are densely deployed on masses of relatively tall (10-inch) stems. This and most of the following cultivars bloom in mid-April here, doing best in dappled shade and well-drained, humus-rich soil. Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$12
Corydalis solida 'Dieter Schacht' ~ Among the most vigorous and intensely hued of the cultivars in its color range, 'Dieter' bears a profusion of enchanting strawberry-pink flowers. Plant one (or three), and you'll have a nice clump in not too long. Continental/Modified continental. Zone 4. SOLD OUT
1/$12
Corydalis solida 'Evening Dream' ~ One of the treasure trove of exciting C. solida cultivars that trace their origin to the vicinity of Penza in western Russia, this dreamy corydalis displays dense spikes of pale icy blue flowers on compact stems. The relatively dark leaves contrast tellingly with the ethereal blooms. Continental/Modified continental. Zone 4.
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1/$12
Corydalis solida 'George Baker' ~ For all the many beautiful takes on C. solida that have surfaced lately, this bright salmon-red selection remains one of the best. We have the real thing, rather than one of the inferior pretenders circulating under this name. Romania; Modified continental. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$12
Corydalis solida 'Merlin' ~ The lips of the long-spurred, snow-white flowers are intricately edged and brushed with violet-blue, in a color composition that is as dramatic as it is simple. An absolute stunner. Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5.
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1/$15
Corydalis solida 'Nettleton Pink' ~ A vigorous clone with large racemes of lilac-pink flowers, produced early in the C. solida season. It appears to be very close to what we have received as 'Sixtus', and may be synonymous. Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5.
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1/$12
Corydalis solida 'Prasil Strain' ~ Despite its name, this is a vegetatively propagated, brick-red clone of Prasil Strain extraction. The color is deepest in cool springs. A worthy rival of 'George Baker', it self-sows and increases to form rubicund colonies. Woodsy conditions. Modified continental. Zone 5.
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1/$12
Corydalis solida 'Purple Beauty' ~ Also ranking near the top of the C. solida selections is this – ummmm – purple beauty, whose flowers are among the largest and richest in coloration of its tribe. Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Corydalis solida 'Purple Bird' ~ Another corydalis decked out in purple, this time with rosy undertones. A lovely foil to pink and white cultivars. Modified continental. Zone 4.
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1/$6
Corydalis solida Rainbow Mix ~ If you like the ruddy end of the corydalis spectrum, this mixture of pink-, red-, and burgundy-flowered solidas will give you a good sampling for a nice price. Modified continental. Zone 4.
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1/$5
Corydalis solida Transylvanian Mix ~ Here is yet another line of Transylvanian seedlings, wherein you will discover some delicious pink- and red-flowered forms. They will wax most colorful in cooler climes. Modified continental; Romania. Zone 5.
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1/$10
Corydalis solida 'Vermion Dawn' ~ Large, rich deep purple flowers crowd the relatively tall stems of this colorful and robust Ruksans introduction. . Continental/Modified continental. Zone 4.
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1/$12
Corydalis solida 'White Knight' ~ Large, abundant, pure-white flowers ride in at the end of the C. solida season (mid to late April here). Of West Russian lineage. Continental/Modified continental. Zone 4.
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1/$12
Corydalis solida 'White Swallow' ~ Can one ever have too many white-flowered C. solida? Given the context of that question, you can probably guess our answer. The prolific blooms of 'White Swallow' have long, slender, graceful spurs that do indeed suggest something on the wing. Their white coloration carries hints of charcoal-gray, which condenses into blotches at their snouts. Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5.
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1/$12
Corydalis turtschaninovii ~ We once again offer a few tubers of this surpassingly beautiful blue-flowered corydalis. As many as 2 dozen of these blooms form dense caerulean spikes on 6- to 8-inch stems in late April, at the end of the corydalis season. No genus does blue better than this one. As if that weren't enough, it's also exceptionally hardy. Continental; Manchuria to SE Russia. Zone 4. SOLD OUT
1/$12
Corydalis vittae ~ One look at the c.v. of this rarely offered beauty and you'll know it's a corydalis of the first water. Inflorescence: dense racemes of up to 15 large white flowers atop 4- to 6-inch stems at the end of the corydalis season. Cultivation: easy in partial shade and humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil. Multiplication: often occurs via self-sowing if more than one plant is present.  Modified continental; Caucasus. Zone 5.
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1/$12
Corydalis 'Going Rouge' ~ Serendipity happens, as the attached photo demonstrates. Received as straight Corydalis kusnetzovii, the plant in question flowered as Corydalis kusnetzovii in drag (possibly due to parental assistance from C. decipiens). Not only is it more flamboyant than its kusnetzovian parent, it's also a faster multiplier (as well as divider). We've increased it to the point where we can part with a few tubers. Modified continental; NW Caucasus, SW Russia. Zone 5.
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1/$14

ERANTHIS
Winter aconite
 
Eranthis hyemalis ~ These plump, healthy tubers of winter aconite will give you lots of bright yellow buttercup blooms in earliest spring (or late winter, polar jet stream willing). Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$3
Eranthis hyemalis 'Flore Pleno' ~ Yes indeed, a double-flowered eranthis, which produces pompons of yellow and chartreuse in late winter. The occasional bloom reverts to single, thus raising the possibility of raising seedlings that may themselves be doubles. This rare and much sought-after cultivar is one of the parents of a mini-swarm of acolyte aconites that are about to hit the market. Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$10

ERYTHRONIUM (Liliaceae)
Dogtooth violet; trout lily
 
Erythronium dens-canis 'Charmer' ~ The backswept blooms and mottled leaves of the European dogtooth violet are far too seldom seen in American gardens. So this year, as always, we are offering a few of the best, including 'Charmer'. The April flowers are pale lilac-purple with a green throat; the leaves have pale green and bronze marbling. Modified continental/Maritime/Continental; Europe to W Asia. Zone 3. SOLD OUT
1/$10
Erythronium dens-canis 'Frans Hals' ~ Rich violet-purple flowers are artistically ornamented with maroon and yellow throats. Modified continental/Maritime/Continental; Europe to W Asia. Zone 3.
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1/$4
Erythronium dens-canis 'Purple King' ~ The flowers of this vigorous and eximious selection are large and cyclamen-pink, with amber, red-brushed throats. The purple-green leaves are boldly dappled with silver.Modified continental/Maritime/Continental; Europe to Japan. Zone 3.
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1/$5
Erythronium dens-canis 'Rose Queen' ~ A pastel-rose-pink selection, distinct from the more common 'Pink Perfection'. Modified continental/Maritime/Continental; Europe to W Asia. Zone 3. SOLD OUT
1/$4
Erythronium dens-canis 'Snowflake' ~ An amber and maroon eye-blotch marks the otherwise white bloom. Modified continental/Maritime/Continental; Europe to Japan. Zone 3.
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1/$4
Erythronium dens-canis 'White Splendour' ~ White, tawny-eyed flowers appear earlier than those of most erythronia. Modified continental/Maritime/Continental; Europe to Japan. Zone 3. SOLD OUT
1/$5

FRITILLARIA (Liliaceae)
Fritillary; guinea hen flower; crown imperial
 
Fritillaria bucharica 'Nurek Giant' ~ Showy clusters of upwards of a dozen large snowy flowers – rather than the usual 3 to 7 – crown 18-inch stems in April, making this not only one of the few white-flowered frits, but also one of the most arresting. Requires relatively dry soil in summer.
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1/$9
Fritillaria caucasica ~ Inch-long bells of concord-grape-purple dangle from 12-inch stems in April. Native to subalpine meadows, it likes a humus-rich soil and full sun. Modified continental/Montane; Caucasus to NW Iran. Zone 5.
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1/$12
Fritillaria crassifolia ssp. kurdica ~ Maroon-checkered olive-green bell-flowers bow gracefully from 4-inch stems in April. An ideal candidate for the rock garden or cool greenhouse, it needs sun and a dryish summer rest. Steppe; W Asia. Zone 6.
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1/$9
Fritillaria eduardii ~ The crown jewel of the genus, bearing a corona of broad-flaring, 3-inch-wide, outfacing, orange flowers atop a 2- to 3-foot stem in April, the whole giving the impression of a rarefied F. imperialis (WITHOUT the stench). Ample sun and well-drained, rich soil will bring the best results (it winters easily here). Propagation is by seed only, with 7 or 8 years from germination to bloom – thus the scarcity and the steep price of these flowering-size bulbs. Steppe; Tajikistan. Zone 5.
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1/$20
Fritillaria imperialis 'Aureomarginata' ~ Yes, indeed – a variegated crown imperial. Before you mutter "what will they think of next," consider that this venerable cultivar first unfurled its cream-edged leaves and orange-red flowers to the early spring sun more than 350 years ago. The 3-foot flower stems are heavily stained with purple. Antiquity and novelty, in one pungent package. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$15
Fritillaria imperialis 'Lutea' ~ The clear golden-yellow flowers of this hard to find cultivar are lightly penciled with purple veining. As with others of its species, it flowers in April on 3-foot stems and prefers fertile, open soil and full sun. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$6
Fritillaria latakiensis ~ Imagine a slightly taller, slightly larger-flowered F. elwesii, and you have the gist of this highly ornamental and garden-worthy frit. The purple, green-striped, tubular flowers nod from 18-inch stems. Give it sun and dryish summer conditions. Mediterranean; S Turkey to Lebanon. Zone 6.
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1/$8
Fritillaria meleagris 'Alba' ~ Glimmering like a comet (no dirty snowball, this) amid the duskier colors of the planetary cultivars (which see below), white guinea hen flower is a venerable but still much sought after form of its tribe. We have a veritable Oort cloud of them this year. Modified continental/Maritime; Europe. Zone 4. Modified continental/Maritime; Europe. Zone 4.
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1/$3
Fritillaria meleagris 'Jupiter' ~ It's altogether fitting that the planet Jupiter – known for its Big Red Spot – should lend its name to this, the Big Red Guinea Hen Flower (although it is not as large as 'Mars', which is a bit of a baffler). Like Jupiter in opposition on a clear spring night, it will draw the eye of anyone who's paying any attention at all. (Which reminds us somehow of the story of the calls that flooded the Griffith Observatory on the night of the Northridge Earthquake, inquiring as to the strange glow in the sky. Which, as you may have guessed, was the Milky Way.) Modified continental/Maritime; Europe. Zone 4.
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1/$6
Fritillaria meleagris 'Saturnus' ~ Another cultivar that should be of astronomical interest to our fellow bulb junkies out there, this rare beauty is NOT the color of methane, but rather a pale violet suffused with burgundy. Ring not included. Modified continental/Maritime; Europe. Zone 4. Modified continental/Mediterranean. Zone 5.
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1/$6
Fritillaria messanensis ssp. gracilis ~ This Balkan native brings the maroon-and-green color scheme into the shade garden, where it prefers a dryish niche. The flowers nod from 8-inch stems in late April or so. Montane/Mediterranean; W Balkans. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$14
Fritillaria nigra ~ Whether this species actually exists is in serious question (it shows close affinities with F. montana, F. orientalis, and F. pyrenaica), but all are agreed that it is one of the best of the genus for the open garden. The purple-checkered flowers (on a green background) are broadly bell-shaped and nod from 20-inch stems. Montane/Mediterranean; S France to Caucasus. Zone 5.
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1/$5
Fritillaria olivieri ~ Dapper maroon-and-green bells with reflexed tips nod from 15-inch, narrow-leaved stems, giving the impression of a high-rise Fritillaria crassifolia ssp. kurdica. We offer it for the first time in 2017. Montane/Steppe; W Iran. Zone 5. SOLD OUT
1/$8
Fritillaria pallidiflora ~ Large (1.5-inch), primrose-yellow bells, dangling from foot-tall stems above ribbed, gray-green leaves, provide one of the highlights of the April shade garden. Add some trilliums and Mertensia virginica, and you’ve got a masterpiece. Very easy and very hardy (it even self-sows). Our bulbs are NOT from and are superior to mass trade stock. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 3. AGM
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1/$5
Fritillaria persica 'Senköy' ~ Here is the state of the art in species persica, with purple bells that are shapelier, deeper-hued, and more abundant than those of 'Adiyaman'. Give it gritty, fertile soil. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 3. AGM
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1/$15
Fritillaria raddeana ~ Sickly orange-flowered crown imperials are a dime a dozen. This is not one of them. Rather, it's one of the crowning glories of the genus, and a vigorous one to boot. Airy coronas of moonlight-yellow, cup-shaped, 2-inch-wide flowers repose on 2- to 3-foot stems in April. Sun, good drainage, and some summer warmth suit it best. It's as rock-hardy and long-lived here as the run of the mill crown imperials are not. Steppe; NE Iran to Turkmenistan. Zone 4.
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1/$15
Fritillaria ruthenica ~ Like F. meleagris, it blooms in April and May, it's checkered, and it's adaptable to most partly shaded and sunny sites; unlike guinea hen flower, it bears deep-purple flowers (with strikingly contrasting yellow interiors) on 20-inch stems. It's destined to become a classic. Modified continental/Continental; S Russia to Ukraine. Zone 3.
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1/$12
Fritillaria sewerzowii ~ A curious and hauntingly beautiful species which is sometimes placed in its own genus, this is one of those floral wonders that borders on legend. The large, olive-green, bell-shaped flowers bow from broad-leaved, 10-inch stems, which arise from unusually large bulbs. The purple flushing on the petals perfectly echoes the hue of the large protruding anthers. This marvel requires well-drained soil and may need protection from rain in moist-summer areas. Steppe; C Asia. Zone 4.
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1/$18
Fritillaria stenanthera Cambridge form ~ Fritty in pink. In this robust floriferous selection upwards of a dozen silver-pink, maroon-eyed blooms occur in dense, conical, purple-stemmed racemes in early spring. The 10- to 12-inch-tall plants have handsome blue-green leaves. Lovely in combination with Central Asian corydali. Steppe/Montane; C Asia. Zone 5.
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1/$15


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ODYSSEY BULBS
PO Box 382
South Lancaster, MA  01561

mail@odysseybulbs.com